The Thistle - An E-Newsletter of Scotch College, Perth, Western Australia

Headmaster Dr Alec O'Connell

Headmaster's Reflections

Headmaster
Dr Alec O'Connell

Last week I was invited to present on the topic of business and corporate communication to a couple of Senior School classes. Anytime you are asked to present, it provides an opportunity for reflection and review. Following a series of coincidental discussions with senior staff, it reminded me of the need to discern which mode of communication is the best for a community such as Scotch College, and just how much communication is healthy on any given topic, before productivity and the intended message reaches a point of dismissing returns.

At Senior School assembly last Friday, on behalf of our Chaplain, I addressed our boys about one's perspective. In essence, we all carry with us our own perspectives and bias on a given topic. We assume that our way is the right way, or even worse, the only way. However, if we look more closely there is always going to be another way.

In looking to appoint the new king of Israel, Samuel is impressed by external factors such as good looks. However, the Lord rightly points out 'do not look at his appearance, because I have rejected him. For the Lord does not view things as mortals do – they look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.'

Because communication is such an important topic, much has been written and spoken about successful and unsuccessful methods of communicating.  There is a plethora of verbal and non-verbal means to impart messages and add into the mix what we now have through social media mediums such as the quick 140-character grab called Twitter.

Communication between a school and its community is an essential part of being functional and ensuring that everyone is served and heard. Too often, conjecture based on partial information, drives emails which can be misinformed and at times aggressive in their tone.

The most essential thing to remember is that our humanness usually means where possible a call or in person catch up can solve so many things. While we have many ways available through which to communicate, let us not forget that we are social in nature and people like to deal with people. In trying to communicate to the greatest affect, let us remember that we must actively listen, we must seek clarification through factual information, not gossip or innuendo and finally we must take time to reflect on what we have heard and how best we can use communication to ensure everyone is valued and understood.

Speaking about being valued, thank you very much to the Scotch Parent Ball committee who committed so much of their time and energy to ensure we had a great Ball on Saturday night. Nights such as these provide a special opportunity to socially engage with many in our community.

As we enter Week 10, our boys across all three sub-schools will be busier than ever. With compulsory summer sport now over, it is important to ensure that our boys remain active as part of their wellbeing strategies.

In closing, let us remember what our Chaplain has reinforced just recently, that is, we all hold different perspectives on many matters. If we are unaware of our own perspectives, we may try and impose them onto others. The challenge for all of us at Scotch is to serve, support and be there for each other.

Have a great fortnight.

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Revd Justine Wall - Chaplain

Chaplain

Revd Justine Wall
Chaplain

Parental Guidance Recommended at Easter

"So, you remember Jesus who was born at Christmas?

Baby Jesus in the manger?

Yes, well, he died at Easter.

Oh no! What happened?

Some people didn't like what he was saying about God and love, so they killed him by nailing him to a wooden cross. No, don't cry because it's okay! He came back to life again and that's why we have hot cross buns and Easter eggs.

Is he still alive?

Sort of… I tell you what, just eat your chocolate bunny and we'll talk about it next year."

My first conversation about Easter with my five-year-old son was not quite that bad, but it certainly was not one of my better Religious Education lessons. Easter is tricky!

As parents of young children, how do you begin to explain that the holy birth we were celebrating with shepherds and angels just four months ago, ended with an unfair trial and a bloody, public execution? And that is just Good Friday. How can you talk about resurrection with children who have not yet grasped the concept of death?

It is certainly no time to be introducing theological notions of justification or reconciliation. Belief that God so loved the world that he was willing to sacrifice his son and that Jesus died to save us from our sins may be foundational to Christian doctrine, but it does nothing to soften the horrific reality of death by crucifixion.

Picture books and YouTube clips are not much help either and Easter movies are rarely suitable for young viewers. It is hardly surprising then that many parents choose the "G" rated Easter Bunny Story over the "M" rated conclusion to the Jesus saga.

So how can you tell the real Easter story to children without terrifying them? The best advice I have received is to let your child's age and sensitivity take the lead. Generally, preschoolers do not ask and do not need to know the specifics of Jesus' death. It is enough to say that Jesus died and then came back to life to show us that he was God's son and that there is life after death. Allegories like The Story of the Dragonfly are helpful (see here) in discussing death and after life with younger children.

An older child might ask how and why Jesus died. At some stage, you have to discuss the cross as a brutal and ancient form of execution. Again, it is best to keep your answers general at first and gradually become more specific. Over time, your Easter discussions may increase in intensity and realism, but it is important not to lose the message in the detail. It was fear and hate that killed Jesus and God's love that resurrected him to life, and God loves you too.

An excellent allegory of Christ's resurrection is to be found in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis (recommended for children from about Year 3 onwards). When the Lion, Aslan, is executed and then restored to life, he explains the meaning of his resurrection:

" "It means," said Aslan, "that though the Witch knew the Deep Magic, there is a magic deeper still which she did not know. Her knowledge goes back only to the dawn of Time. But if she could have looked a little further back, into the stillness and the darkness before Time dawned, she would have read there a different incantation. She would have known that when a willing victim who had committed no treachery was killed in a traitor's stead, the Table would crack and Death itself would start working backwards."

Let us not take the magic away from our children too quickly. Even the Easter Bunny has his place.

Good luck with the story telling and blessings this Easter.

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Cara Fugill Director of Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning

Mrs Cara Fugill
Director of Teaching and Learning

Cultivating a Partnership between School and Parents

It is common to hear parents say, "I want to help my son learn and be involved in his education but I don't know how."

This is an interesting question that perhaps highlights the change in today's educational model versus the education we were afforded. What teachers are teaching in the classroom is no longer as simple as opening a textbook and directing students to learn the content. Equally, for parents, the task of being involved in their child's education is not just as simple as sitting beside them and helping to locate the answers. So, what is our role as parents and how do we best support our boys?

In the not too distant past, the focus for educators was on assisting students to develop functional skills in remembering facts, perfecting grammar, improving spelling and performing complex mental arithmetic. However, increasingly, these skills are losing their position of importance as technology finds new ways to bridge the divide between those who are highly skilled in these areas, and those who are not. For example, the skill of spelling no longer holds equal position with one's ability to convey meaning through language. In other words, if you cannot spell 'cantankerous', you are probably still going to get by in life, however, using it in the wrong context might not end so well!

In schools now, we are increasingly shifting the focus of our teaching towards concept learning where educators aim for a level of comprehension that moves beyond simple memorisation. For concepts to be developed, they must begin from the basis of some acquired knowledge or skill, which is why the Australian Curriculum of today does not look too dissimilar to that of 30 years ago. The difference is in the way we deliver the curriculum. Conceptual understanding has to be driven by a desire to think deeply about that knowledge and question how it came to be. Concepts are universal, timeless and abstract and when students make genuine connections between concepts, they provide the "Aha!" moments that make learning so engaging and allows our boys to feel a sense of ownership over how they construct knowledge. It is those conceptual understandings, which allow boys to take action as a result of their learning rather than holding it as a meaningless memory.

From a parent's perspective, conceptual learning can occur anywhere, anytime. This sounds similar to how the internet was 'sold' in education 10 years ago. The difference is that one is a second storage device for our memory, which is indeed useful, while the other is the art of conversation. The human element is the essential factor that young minds require to broaden their thinking. Conceptual learning occurs when we invite our boys into a conversation that allows them to be curious, inquisitive and provides a safe place to test assumptions.

"Can you explain to me a rule that you have learned recently?"

"Does that rule always work or can you think of an exception?"

"Do all subjects have rules?"

"What is the difference between a rule in Mathematics and a rule in Science?"

"Why do we create rules?"

"How do you know that, can you give me another example?"

Although having these conversations might seem odd at first, it will no doubt be interesting to see how your sons tackles them. At the very least, this will be a better conversation than, "Have you done your homework?"

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Director of Student and Staff Wellbeing Mr James Hindle

Wellbeing

Mr James Hindle
Director of Student and Staff Wellbeing

What do we actually want for our boys?

I often wonder what the purpose of school is. As each Year 12 group leaves, I wonder whether we have done enough, and what else we could have done to ensure that they were better prepared for life beyond school. The continued focus on ATARs and league tables is something which distresses and disheartens me. So much of a school's productive energy is directed towards the academic sphere of a young man's world, I wonder how we will ever have the courage to release our grip on this and allow other aspects of a young life to flourish more.

I think school is about providing a foundation upon which a young person can build a life. As adults and parents, we must be careful not to carry pre-determined views as to what that life should look like; I think we focus far too much on what kind of course or job they will do rather than what type of person they could be. Certainly, we should be providing them with the benefit of our own experiences in life but, ultimately, we should contribute to them becoming independent yet connected, autonomous yet having a sense of belonging, and determined yet flexible. This is why we have adopted the three pillars of Respect, Resilience and Relationships as the basis for our Wellbeing programmes.

As long as young people feel capable of engaging with the activities they love, dealing with the difficulties they will face, and contributing to making the world a better place, I am not sure we should be wanting anything more for them. What form those things take should, by and large, be up to them. As long as they do not harm themselves or interfere with other people's experience of life, an individual should be free to make his or her own choices in life.

Keeping one's options open is logical, but at some stage, each of us has to make a choice regarding which option to take. I have often seen people paralysed by having too much choice. Perhaps, in the end, it is much better to be able to adopt a positive attitude towards the choices we make rather than having a huge variety of options from which to choose.

The simple questions I ask myself about the boys and young men I see each day are, "What kind of a man do we want him to be?" and, "What kind of person is he becoming?" To answer these, we should look at how they treat themselves and others and what they do for others. I think you can learn a lot about a person when you see them dealing with something which is outside of their normal range of experience. It is interesting to see how they react and interact with others when they do not realise they are being watched. Perhaps most telling is to see what they do when they are dealing with someone who is less powerful than them or who cannot do anything for them. And more often than not, I am extremely pleased by the common decency which I see.

Harmony Day

In Week 8, Captain of School, Harry Gilchrist spoke at both Middle and Senior School assemblies about Harmony Day (21 March). This is a day to celebrate the richness of humanity, to appreciate the diversity of life and the benefits of seeing the world differently. At a time when it seems easier for people to cling to tribalism in so many forms, and to fear what is different, it is crucial for us to encourage our boys to look at the world with curious eyes and open hearts to ensure that they can see a positive collective future. Harmony Day is something we will be working to celebrate more widely in years to come.

Mindfulness

The 'Brain Reset' sessions for Year 11 and 12 have been very well attended, and a number of students have attended multiple sessions. These will continue on Monday and Wednesday for the last two weeks of term, and then will run on Monday and Tuesday in Weeks 1 and 2 of Autumn Term. The more sessions your son attends, the greater the benefit. Please do not foster in or accept from him the excuse that he is too busy. There is nothing more important than him being able to relax his body when it is stressed, to calm his mind when it is crowded with thoughts, and to focus his attention when he faces adversity.

Last Friday, we conducted a whole year experiment with our Year 9s, running a massed mindfulness meditation session in the PE Centre. We spoke with the boys beforehand about the science behind mindfulness and the benefits of regular mindfulness, and then Helen Heppingstone ran a 'Brain Reset'-style session for the boys. It was an incredible occasion; to see over 160 teenage boys engaging with this new skill was remarkable to observe. It was a great start and we will be conducting another session this coming Friday 5 April.

A number of our staff attended a presentation from Mindful Meditation Australia (MMA) on Tuesday night, which is the organisation with whom we are working to train staff and to embed mindfulness in our school. The session was aimed at families and how to incorporate mindfulness into daily life at home, as well as making families more aware of what is being done in school. We will be working with MMA to bring a version of this workshop to Scotch for our parents.

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Mr David Kyle Director of Service and Citizenship

Service and Citizenship

Mr David Kyle
Director of Service and Citizenship

We become what we repeatedly do

I am proud to teach at Scotch College for a number of reasons. Our dedicated staff, our strong focus on mental and physical wellbeing, our extraordinary range of curriculum opportunities and the amazing outdoor education team are just some of the reasons why. Unsurprisingly, what makes me most proud is our dedication to being a community that is service orientated and civically minded, not just locally but internationally too. Dr O'Connell and the College Council believe that these values of Service to others, Stewardship for future generations and Integrity, both personally and as an institution, are so important that they are foremost in all our decision making and our central mission in developing young men of character who will become active members of a global community.

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But why is this important? One reason is to build empathy amongst our community.

Empathy is the ability to understand another person's experiences, perspectives, and feelings. To walk a mile in another man's shoes.

A lack of empathy is unhealthy and makes leadership difficult. In a business sense, not understanding your current and future customers is catastrophic. In daily life, a lack of empathy is a major contributor to the #metoo movement that has destroyed reputations globally. And the events of Christchurch two weeks ago can certainly be attributed to a lack of empathy in one man.

So, can we teach empathy? Like most things, it comes more naturally to some, but it can certainly be practiced and something your teachers seek to help you do as often as possible. And, you become what you repeatedly do.

A guy who was naturally low on the empathy scale was Nathan Buckley. He was known for being brash, for struggling to understand why others would not train as hard as he would, and for generally being focused on number one. Buckley decided this was not the person he wanted to be, and went through a well-documented period of practicing building empathy and thinking of others.

Last year, minutes before one of the biggest games of his career, this practice bore fruits that produced images that will come to define his character. The Collingwood banner ripped and the lady who had made it was distraught. Buckley's empathy shone through and the five seconds he spent consoling her showed a man of tremendous character.

Whatever your natural endowment for empathy, it waxes and wanes according to your feelings at the time. When you are sick and tired, you focus on yourself and when you are overly excited sometimes you forget about others too. This is normal and fine, as long as you realise it and can check yourself when you need to.

Finally, empathy is not about making everyone happy. Churchill said, if you have enemies, it shows you have stood up for something at some time in your life. Empathy is about understanding humanity and seeking to be the best you can be, not pandering to people's emotions.

Practice being empathetic and, as Nathan Buckley showed, it will be second nature when needed most.

Congratulations to the boys who achieved Colours for Community and Service on Friday at Senior School Assembly, they are listed below.

FirstName

LastName

Year

House

William

Moffat-Clarke

10

Stuart

Julian

Kyriakou

11

Stuart

Nicolas

Monger Molowny

11

Alexander

Lincoln

Allan

12

Ross

Benjamin

Gale

12

Ross

Harrison

Gilchrist

12

Keys

Conor

Lenny

12

Anderson

Liam

McCreery

12

Keys

Oscar

Moss

12

Ferguson

Alexander

van Hoek

12

Ross

Alistair

Watters

12

St Andrews

Clothes & Accessories Needed for Bindaring Sale

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Scotch College is once again supporting this local fundraiser.

Over the school holidays, please take the opportunity to clear out your wardrobe as the season changes.

Good Quality clean clothes for men, women and children plus Shoes, Bags, Belts, Scarves and Costume Jewelry in good condition, are needed to stock the 56th Bindaring Clothing Sale at Claremont Showground on Saturday 18 May 2019.

All funds raised support Australian Red Cross local services in our community and last year's sale raised an amazing $195,000.

Collection boxes will be located in the Uniform Shop and Senior /Middle/Jnr School Reception from Wednesday 1 May to Friday 10 May.

We will also have a driveway drop off on Wednesday 8 May, at the Junior School slipway from 7.30am to 9.00am.

Thank you for supporting this event.

Sports Equipment needed for Fair Game

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 Stuart House is supporting Fair Game by collecting and delivering sporting goods to remote communities.

Charlie Thomas – Vice Captain (Service), Stuart House:

We are collecting all sorts of sporting equipment including footballs, soccer balls, basketballs, footy boots, boxing gloves/focus pads, frisbees and skipping ropes. With the end of the summer season now would be a great time to check your winter footwear, and if you have grown out of your sport boots Fair Game will be glad to accept it.

Bins are located in the Senior School, outside Mrs Murray's Office (Student Services), outside the Design and Technology Department and opposite the water fountain at the English Block.

The Smith Family Student 2 Student Buddy Programme

The Smith Family is looking for students in Years 6 – 10 to be a part of their Student 2 Student programme. See the flyer and video for more information.

Please contact Mr David Kyle, Director of Service and Citizenship if interested.

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All School Matters

Middle School Information Sessions

Scotch College invites interested families (new to the College) to attend our April Middle School Information Sessions on Wednesday 10 April, 5.30pm - 7.00pm or Thursday 11 April, 9am - 10.30am.

A critical time of transition for your son, our Middle School is loaded with innovative thinking and practice, and rich in engagement. Meet Mr Richard Ledger, Head of Middle School, and find out how your son will be supported, encouraged and challenged both academically and personally.

If you know a family who may be interested, please direct them to the College website for further information and to register: http://bit.ly/2GmdnIt

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Worry Warts Production

A lovely cast of Year 6 and Year 7 students have been working diligently to present this years 6/7 production of Worry Warts by Morris Gleitzman, adapted for the stage by Eva Di Cesare. Inspired by Gleitzman's humorous novel of the same name, the play explores themes of belonging, happiness and family relationships with outback Australia as a backdrop for the performance.

About the play:

What makes someone a 'Worry Wart'?

Keith Shipley's parents are not as happy as they used to be. With a recent move to Australia and financial troubles looming, Keith decides the only way to cheer up his 'misery guts' parents is to make them very, very rich. Keith has a plan and a great hunt for opals begins in the outback...

Performances will be held during Week 10 on Thursday 4 April at 7.00pm, Friday 5 April at 7.00pm and Saturday 2 April at 2.00pm.

Tickets are available from the Scotch College website. Adult $15 Child $10

Mrs Emma Cooper
Drama Teacher

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Uniform Shop

Opening Hours for Winter Uniform Changeover

No appointments are necessary. The Uniform Shop will be open extra hours over and above the normal opening times, as follows.

Summer Term Extra Opening Hours

Wednesday 3 April

7.30am to 9.00am

Wednesday 10 April

7.30am to 9.00am

Holiday Opening Hours

Friday 26 April

9.00am to 4.00pm (lunch: noon – 1.00pm)

Monday 29 April

9.00am to 4.00pm (lunch: noon – 1.00pm)

Boys need to be in Winter uniform on Tuesday 30 April (start of term).

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Holiday Phone Outage

On Monday 15 April, during the school holidays, the College's phone service will be unavailable from 7.00am for approximately two hours, as part of scheduled works.

During this time, if you call the College, you will receive the following message "Service is not available, please try again later" or "This number is not in service, please try again later".

We hope the interruption will be minimal and thank you in advance for your understanding if you try to call during that time.

Mr Simon Hollingshead
Information and Learning Technology Manager

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Scotch College Festival of Rugby

With the assistance of the Western Force, Scotch College is hosting the Festival of Rugby from 24 – 27 April 2019. All spectators welcome.

Participating Schools:

Aranmore Catholic College
Christ Church Grammar School
Guildford Grammar
Newington College 1st XV
Newington College 2nd XV
Scotch College
Thornlie Senior High School
Trinity College
Wesley College

Date of Festival:  Wednesday 24 - Saturday 27 April 2019 – Rest Day 25 April (ANZAC Day)

Venue: Scotch Gardner Oval and Scotch McKay Oval

Fixtures

Wednesday 24 April

10.00am

Wesley

v

Trinity

v

Thornlie Senior High

12.00pm

Christ Church

v

Guildford

1.15pm

Scotch

v

Newington 2nd XV

2.30pm

Aranmore

v

Newington 1st XV

           

Friday 26 April

11.00am

Trinity

v

Guildford

12.15am

Christ Church

v

Thornlie Senior High

1.30pm

Scotch

v

Wesley

2.45pm

Aranmore

v

Newington 2nd XV

           

Saturday 27 April

11.30am

Festival XV

v

Aranmore

1.00pm

Festival XV

v

Newington 2nd XV

2.30pm

U18 Squad

v

Newington 1st XV

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Performing Arts

As another busy term comes to a close, we again reflect on our very busy Performing Arts calendar and the inherent value of each of the items in there. As a staff team, the way we determine value is always framed around the question of "what's in the best interests of the boys' education?"

We are not interested in populating a calendar full of events just for the sake of having another concert or staging another show. We are interested in the critical items that have a direct impact on our core business, our boys' education within a performing arts context.

In music, we are beginning to re-align our performance calendar with real life, real world performances – actually doing a gig as it were. There will still be the ubiquitous school concerts where appropriate; however families will start to see an increase in real world gigs.

One such unique learning experience has just occurred with Jazz P, one of our small jazz combo ensembles providing the first part of the entertainment for the Scotch Parents' Ball. This coming weekend, our Senior String musicians, along with soloists, Jazz P, the Drumline, Pipe Band and the Jazz Orchestra will be performing at the National Rotary Conference, which is being hosted by the College. What fantastic learning experiences these are for our students.

Hot off the press is the news that we will be hosting world renowned classical guitarist Slava Grigoryan and his wife – cellist Sharon – for a public concert and series of workshops in May. Save the date for Wednesday 29 May, with an intimate public concert in the newly refurbished PC Anderson Memorial Chapel.

Music Tuition enrolments

This is the final week that we will be receiving enrolments for Music Tuition commencing in Autumn Term. Visit https://my.scotch.wa.edu.au/music to complete the online enrolment form or contact Scotch Music Administration on 9383 6842.

Upcoming Performing Arts events

Thursday 4 April through Saturday 6 April: Worry Warts drama production

Friday 5 April: 2019 National Rotary Conference – various music ensembles

Saturday 6 April: 2019 National Rotary Conference – various music ensembles

Wednesday 10 April: Summer Music Soirée (JS and MS music soloists)

Friday 12 April: selected Year 12 Drama students present their monologues at the SS assembly

Mr Scott Loveday
Head of Performing Arts

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Mr John Stewart Head of Junior School

Junior School

Mr John Stewart
Head of Junior School

From the Head of Junior School

Considering a Tragedy

On Sunday 17 March, I sat in church with my family, as I usually do on a Sunday morning, listening to our priest deliver his homily for the week. I glanced around the church at the congregation which included mums and dads with their children, grandparents and elderly couples, babies crawling around and toddlers running up the aisles. I glanced around to the open doors to my right, leading onto the oval and the open doors behind me. My thoughts then went to Christchurch to the 50 people attending their Friday worship service in their mosque when a man walks in, ends the lives of some and changes the lives of their families and friends forever. I thought about how vulnerable we were seated there and, that if someone decided to wreak havoc in our congregation, there was absolutely nothing we could do except hope and pray.

In an interview following the attacks in Christchurch on 15 March, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern noted that "The world has seen us as just who we are. We're a nation of over 200 ethnicities, 160 languages, we see ourselves as peaceful and inclusive. The act has been so counter to that..."

I am not writing today about faith. I am not writing about God's role in this happening or not happening or helping us recover from it. I am thinking about what can be done to prevent people from becoming like this individual, to be filled with hate and to take it to this extreme.

When I reflect on my life and the opportunities that I have had as I was growing up, my thoughts return to my home town of Thunder Bay, which was a very isolated small town effectively in the middle of nowhere. In Thunder Bay, if you were a person who was not a white Canadian or a native Canadian you stood out like a sore thumb. On my paper route there was one Indian family, a doctor's family, and everyone else was white.

My opportunities to meet people of other nationalities and cultures did not happen in my home town. As I have lived outside of Canada and travelled, I have met people from every continent of the world and from so many countries. The opportunity to meet those people and have those experiences has coloured my opinion of people around the world. I didn't like all of them, I didn't get along with all of them, however, I guess in the words of Martin Luther King 'I judged them on the content of their character and not by the colour of their skin'.

So how can we deal with the hate that some people feel? What can we do as parents? Experiences and opportunities, teaching our children how to value the people they meet and form an opinion based on the person, not their religion or their skin colour.

Looking at my children's future and what I want to do for them as a parent, I want them to meet people from lots of places with different beliefs and learn to appreciate and respect those people and understand, that while we all may appear different, we have a lot more in common than we realise.  Encouraging understanding, respect and kindness will help us to overcome fear and hatred. To create social connectedness, it is not enough to simply tolerate the differences of other people, cultures and backgrounds but rather we need to create an inclusive society in which everyone is able to live a life of dignity.

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French News

Bonjour everyone!

Do you ever wonder if there are real-life situations in which you can use your French? Well, we found just such a situation when we invited guests from Romily House to visit us here at school for a French morning tea in March. The boys from 3S and 3W took their French usage out of the classroom and put it to use welcoming our neighbours, the residents of Romily House – a sheltered accommodation facility on Shenton Road – to a French morning tea. Residents arrived at 11.00am, where they were welcomed with a song and a performance of our most recent role-play: "Le bebe est perdu!" (The baby is lost!) about a baby that is mistakenly picked up on a bus. It allowed the boys to use all of their family vocabulary as each family member was interviewed as part of the investigation. After the performance, our boys asked Romily House guests if they wanted tea, coffee, milk, sugar or a biscuit, all in French. Romily House guests had been practicing "oui", "non" and "merci" for their responses. Once the tea and coffee had been served, we brought out the checkers boards, to teach our guests checkers and challenge them to a game which went down a treat. It was a wonderful opportunity for our Year 3 students to embrace members of their community, to build links to their classroom UOI, and to use their French with a brand new audience. Bravo 3S and 3W on your language skills and your kind, welcoming acceptance of our guests, who loved the experience. Au revoir!

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Madame Vinton
French Specialist

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Year 4T News

The 4T boys have bounced into the school year with enthusiasm for new friends and new learning. Friendships were quickly re-established and strong routines adopted. Vibrant personalities with strong leadership potential and a zest for life fill our classroom and the dynamic is exciting and wonderful.

Our first unit of inquiry 'Who We Are', saw us investigate our overall well-being through the lens of physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. Boys engaged in a vast range of activities that allowed them to consider actions that supported optimum health. Physical activity was a given, but we gained a deeper appreciation for good nutrition, meditation, drawing, music to create a peaceful space, the positive effect of strong sleep routines and the calming nature of soft things like cuddling pets and snuggling toys. We are sensory creatures and should encourage natural and healthy practices that support this.

With blood and guts playing a part in our investigation, scientific experimentation took front and centre to support boys making deeper conceptual understandings to broader physical issues. Jelly, marshmallows, jaffas and sprinkles made a deliciously gruesome cup of blood. Observing eggs soaked in vinegar left us quaking at the effect of food acid on the teeth. We researched the amount of sugar in our favourite Boost Juice order and shuddered in horror at the amount. Using glucose syrup, we watched how the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream was quick and immediate but noted that flour took longer to absorb. We relayed this to the type of foods we consume and the release of energy from them. As you might well imagine, the lads had a glorious time mucking about with it all.

Continuing the theme of the gruesome and grotesque, boys celebrated their love of language by dabbling in the realm of spook. Poetic phrases were written about body parts and narratives were written to frighten and scare. Despite the dark and demonly landscape, each boy pursued the element of fear and suspense with rigor, creating a whole host of stories to frighten the life out of you. Oh, the power of words. Strangely, the only ones not scared were the lads themselves!

With a second unit unfolding, the lads now look to the skies as they explore the celestial beings in our Solar System. We'll consider the position and movement of Earth and technological advances that encourage human curiosity to be explored. Igniting their own curiosity, a visit to Scitech saw the lads enthralled by the Planetarium and gain a burgeoning understanding of just how small we are within its vastness. Professor Peter Quinn, a world renowned astrophysicist, also visited the boys and shared his vast knowledge with the boys, including details about Australia's Square Kilometre Array; the world's largest radio telescope. Our boys are truly the luckiest in all the universe.

I could continue to wax lyrical about the wonders of our year's beginning, however, most important is that each and every boy in 4T is to be congratulated for the effort and effervescence they have brought to our classroom and our school. We can only look forward to celebrating and harnessing all this enthusiasm as we go forth.

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Mrs Rebecca Turkich
Year 4 Teacher 

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Enrichment in the Junior School

The first term of 2019 has seen enrichment and extension in the Junior School take on many shapes and forms.

First and foremost on my mind, has been getting into classrooms and getting to know the boys; how they work, what their learning styles and strengths are whilst also assisting with the high levels of differentiation that are taking place. It has been wonderful to work with the boys alongside their classroom teachers and the Academic Support team, allowing every boy to access learning at his own level of ability.

The co- curricular clubs on offer have really broadened opportunities and there are many clubs that cater beautifully for those boys that seek further challenge and enrichment; Chess, Science, Newspaper Club, Passion Project Club, Maths Extension Club to name a few.

For the first time Junior School boys were invited to compete in an Inter-House Philosothon with the Middle School where boys sat in a circle of inquiry and debated topics such as:

Is it more important to help yourself, help your family, help your society, or help the world?"

What would you genetically change about humans to make them a better species?

If a child somehow survived and grew up in the wilderness without any human contact, how "human" would they be without the influence of society and culture?

Is privacy a right?

Topics not for the faint hearted! However, the boys were impressive in their ability to dissect topics, analyse opinions and research, building upon one another's' views, collaborating in circles of inquiry, to produce rich and stimulating discussions. Congratulations to our Junior School competitors Leon Hugo, Jake Cuomo, Logan Herbert, Charlie Warden, Thomas Lovegrove and Anderson Strk-Lingard. Our winning house was Bruce House and the Year 5 Champion Philosopher was Charlie Warden.

Another exciting collaboration with Middle School is the Cluedunnit competition, run by the Law Society of Western Australia. Boys meet weekly to investigate a fictional criminal offence with the goal of identifying the offender. They are given a brief at the commencement of the competition that includes a police statement of facts, witness statements and forensic evidence and students are encouraged to ask the Law Society staff questions about the incident to get further clues/information in order to correctly identify the suspect. Each team prepares and submits its findings in a written or electronic medium. Our super sleuths from Junior School are Jack Mayo, William Macknay, Thomas Lovegrove, Charlie Robinson, Hugo Atkins, Leon Hugo, Logan Herbert, Oliver Campbell, Brendan Chin and Daniel Weustink. They are applying themselves fully to the case and are skilled in the deductions that they are making.

I look forward to overseeing the Da Vinci decathlon and Tournament of the Minds in terms 2 and 3 and value the opportunity to be involved with such creative minds.

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Mrs Alison Webster
Junior School Enrichment Co-ordinator

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Headmaster's Commendations

Congratulations to these boys for receiving a Headmaster's Commendation.

Week 10B Summer Term   – Headmaster's Commendations  

1G

Oscar Alder

1G

Otto Blackburne

1G

Finn Buchanan

1G

Jensen Cox

2A

Sebastian Kahl

2A

Ethan Palassis

2A

Rowan Sundaresan

   

3S

Harrison Alder

3S

Lucas Kwan

3S

Angus Noble

   

3W

Lachlan Gillett

3W

Xavier Lewis

3W

Emerson McNally

   

4C

Lachlan Buzza

4C

Maxwell Fine

4C

Thomas Kitchen

4C

Angus McIntosh

4T

Felix Constantine

4T

Roman Merenda

4T

Konrad Michael

4T

Eryn Richards

4T

Jacob Young

   

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Mr Richard Ledger Head of Middle School

Middle School

Mr Richard Ledger
Head of Middle School

From the Head of Middle School

NAPLAN Online

The National Assessment Program in Years 3, 5, 7, 9 called NAPLAN moves from a pen and paper-based document to a suite of online assessments at Scotch College this year.  Online testing has two distinct advantages:  The turnaround time between doing the tests and receiving the results will be only weeks rather than months when compared to the previous delivery model, allowing us to use what we learn from the testing back in the classroom for the second half of the year.  The other anticipated advantage is the ability for the online test to be adaptive, or reactive, offering students ability-based pathways through the test which in turn provides us with a more detailed picture of each student's understanding in Numeracy and Literacy.

The National Assessment Program has produced a short video highlighting the advantages NAPLAN online has to offer.  NAPLAN 2019 will be held in Week 4 next term.

The national expectation for literacy and numeracy achievement is for students to reach a Band 8 across the 5 NAPLAN assessments at Year 9.  This is considered the minimum level of Mathematics and English literacy to complete secondary schooling in Western Australia.  Students who do not achieve a Band 8 following Year 9 NAPLAN have up to six further opportunities between Year 10 and Year 12 to achieve this standard via the OLNA testing.  OLNA is the Online Literacy and Numeracy Assessment.

Bluewater Primary School

This week we begin our fundraising for Bluewater Primary School's restocking of their flooded library in earnest.  Cupcakes will be sold for $1 at recess and lunchtime and a second-hand book stall will be running throughout the week.  Books will range in price from 50c - $3.  More donations of second-hand books would be greatly appreciated.  Our Free Dress Day is scheduled for Wednesday of Week 11.  Organisers are hoping for at least a gold coin donation for the joy of wearing free dress to school.  The total funds collected will be matched by a group of book stores that have expressed an interest in supporting our endeavours.  Fingers crossed the kids at Bluewater Primary will have some new books on their library shelves for next term.

Communion at Chapel

Next Monday for our final Chapel service of the term, Reverend Wall will hold a Communion as a way of celebrating Easter and also showing our boys a Communion Service.  All boys will be invited to participate although it is optional to take part.  Grape juice will be our wine substitute.  We would be pleased if you had the chance to discuss this coming event with you son and help him determine his participation in the Communion Service.

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8.3 Studies Perth – The Sinking City

Today, over two thirds of the world's population live within a few kilometres of the coast, but as the boys in 8.3 are learning, the coastline can be a very vulnerable place.  Storms are becoming more frequent and violent, and as the climate warms, sea levels continue to rise.

Over Summer Term, our class has been investigating communities that live in close proximity to these volatile, coastal landscapes.  Students have been studying a range of geographical factors including how a coastline is affected by forces such as erosion, weathering, waves, climate change and human interferences.  In Week 8, boys attended a Geography field trip where they put their knowledge and skills to the test, examining the popular seaside hotspot, Bathers Beach.

On their return to school, students designed a future management solution for the region, weighing up how best to satisfy the wants and needs of the community.  Boys thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to use their skills in an authentic seaside setting and particularly relished the chance to enjoy fish and chips on the beach!

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Ms Lisa O'Toole
8.3 Homeroom Teacher

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7.1 Moray Adventure

Last week the boys of 7.1 travelled down the freeway to the picturesque bushland of Moray.  For many Year 7 boys it was their first time at Moray.  Nervous but excited faces, lined the windows of the bus as we packed up and headed south.

The boys embraced all aspects of the Outdoor Education Programme but a favourite would have to be the raft building and canoeing.  A popular game was the see-saw, where boys stand at either end of the canoe and try to flip the other person into the water.  This resulted in much laughter and some sneaky tactical movements employed by some boys.  Raft building also saw the competitive spirit in force.  Boys were asked to build a raft with materials provided, that was sea worthy, as well as fast.  The scientists, with an interest in physics, were in their element.  There was much talk about hydrodynamics, force, buoyancy and weight distribution.  The winners, helping themselves to extra dessert!

Sleeping arrangements were different each night.  Boys experienced sleeping in tents, dorms or hutchies and were surprised to learn that swags can be very comfortable.  Sleeping outdoors was the preferred option as the days grew hotter and the nights cooler.

The climbing wall was another challenge faced by our Year 7 boys.  One after the other they climbed higher and higher placing their trust in the loyal belayers down below.  Many felt at the start that the climbing wall was beyond their capabilities only to find that they achieved heights beyond their own expectations.  One of the Year 7 boys commented "every activity was great fun and you always learned something new about yourself".

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We are so fortunate to have Moray.  What a great experience it is for our boys and staff!

Mrs Karen Woods
7.1 Homeroom Teacher

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Year 7 NAPLAN Practice Test

In preparation for NAPLAN testing in May, our Homeroom teachers have been familiarising your sons with the new NAPLAN online platform.

As part of our preparations, Scotch College is also participating in a 'Combined Practice Test' on Wednesday 3 April.  The WA School Curriculum and Standards Authority has requested that all schools in WA complete this test at the same time, in order to view the platform operating with a high volume of users before it opens for NAPLAN 2019 on Tuesday 14 May.

Important points to note:

  • All Year 7 boys will be completing the Combined Practice Test in their homerooms.
  • The test is 45 minutes long and combines literacy and numeracy components.
  • Disability adjustments have been applied, so if you son normally receives extra time or rest breaks, this will be included.
  • We will not receive data or answers for the Combined Practice Test.
  • Please ensure your son brings a fully charged laptop and his earphones to school on Wednesday 3 April.

Should you have any further queries, please email Sophie Berry at Sophie.Berry@scotch.wa.edu.au

Mrs Sophie Berry
Dean of Teaching & Learning Middle School

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Important Dates in Middle School Summer Term

Tuesday 2 April

Year 6/7 Production "Worry Warts" All Day Dress Rehearsal, Foundation Theatre

Thursday 4 April

Year 7.5/7.6 Moray Programme Returns

Year 6/7 "Worry Warts" Production Opening Night, 7.00pm Foundation Theatre

Friday 5 April

MS Assembly, 12.00pm MacKellar Hall

Year 6/7 "Worry Warts" Production, 7.00pm Foundation Theatre

Saturday 6 April

Year 6/7 "Worry Warts" Production, 2.00pm Foundation Theatre

Year 6 Family Picnic, from 3.00pm Sunset Heritage Precinct Dalkeith

Sunday 7 April

Year 8 Bibbulmun Track Departs (Residential Life Students only)

Wednesday 10 April

Year 8 Bibbulmun Track Returns (Residential Life Students only)

Friday 12 April

Summer Term Concludes, 3.25pm

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Mr Peter Burt - Head of Senior School

Senior School

Mr Peter Burt
Head of Senior School

From the Head of Senior School

We know some of the benefits of playing sport include improved physical fitness and mental health, but with our summer sports season reaching its conclusion, it is a good time to focus on the other reasons that we value sport. All of our Senior School students take part in this aspect of the cocurricular programme and we know it is integral to their personal development. Training and competing alongside their peers gives students the opportunity to build new relationships and involve themselves with those in other year groups. Our Year 12 boys play an important role in this regard, as they provide leadership and act as role models for the younger students. In a way, it is an extension of what happens in their Mentor Groups at school, albeit in a different context and environment.

The boys learn to apply themselves, to work through challenging situations and to build resilience. They realise that we all fail at different times and it is how we respond in these situations that is important. Reflection is a vital part of this process and is a skill the boys are using in other areas of life. While it is important not to dwell on losses, or performances that did not meet our expectations, there are learning opportunities in each training and competitive situation. These guide our preparation for the next challenge and can motivate us individually or as a group.

Our focus at Scotch is on how we play the game and the respect we show for our opponents and our teammates. Two of our core values are:

Integrity:  adherence to moral and ethical principles; soundness of moral character; honesty.

Stewardship:  using talents, abilities and resources in a responsible and honourable manner.

While the opportunities to develop these are available across a variety of experiences and activities, they are also central to how we approach our sporting programmes. As a College, we value how the students participate and compete, and how they respond to different situations. The life-long learning opportunities that exist in the sporting environment are essential to their development. The boys learn to play a role within a group and to help benefit a team, sometimes to the detriment of their own personal gains. They may make mistakes but they grow and learn from these, and that is part of the beauty of sport. We value their effort, their teamwork and the manner in which they compete.

Our staff are involved in the sporting programme as coaches and managers and this helps foster relationships and improve communication. Importantly, it also helps us "know the boy". These staff play an important role in our co-curricular programme as they provide a variety of expertise, guidance and support for the boys and help them challenge themselves both individually and as a team.

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Scotch College Tours

Year 11 and 12 Community Service Tour to India – December 2019

Current Year 11 and 12 students are invited to apply for the Community and Service Tour to India, running from 7 to 22 December 2019. This tour will provide students with insights into the Indian culture as well as its political, social and historical context, but its primary aim is to provide Scotch boys with an opportunity to use their expertise to develop and deliver learning modules and teaching resources to students and teachers; resources designed to enrich the limited educational assets that exist in disadvantaged schools. The tour aims to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on issues concerning gender discrimination, poverty, justice, service and community development.

In the lead up to the tour, each participant will be responsible for fundraising, with all monies raised going to the Mukti Mission School, where the boys will engage with Mukti students, assisting them with their academic studies, organising and delivering sports programmes and serving at Mukti's special needs school.

This is not simply a sightseeing tour; it combines community and service of a challenging nature with an opportunity for your son to experience a rich, unique culture and broaden his understanding of himself and his global community. If you would like more information, please contact Mrs Joanne Hallis, Tours Administrator at Tours@scotch.wa.edu.au.

To assist you in planning ahead, the following tours are proposed for the 2020 calendar year:

Scotch College Tours Agenda 2020

Dates

Tour

Destination

Duration

Estimated Cost

Year Level

Tour Leader

Notes

Summer Term

15-21 March

International Mathematical Modelling Challenge

Singapore

7 days

$3,000

11-12

Tyrone Giese

Invitation only

April holidays

Rugby

Fiji

10-14 days

$3,000

10-12

Alex Wood /

Justin Creighton

 

13-20 April

Football

Melbourne

8 days

$2,000

10-12

Darren Mumford

 

April holidays

National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA)

Sydney

7 days

$3,300

11-12

Sarah Combes

 

2-16 or 9-25 April

Indonesia Study tour

Jogyakarta and Jakarta

14 days

$3,800

11-12

Wilfred Liauw

 

Autumn Term

29 June –

8 July

PLC / Scotch Music - Rhapsody Rotorua Festival

New Zealand

10 days

$3,290

8-12

Scott Loveday

 

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Workplace Learning Programme – Request for Host Businesses

A growing number of our Year 11 and Year 12 boys are going out to work each Wednesday as part of our INSTEP Workplace Learning program. The boys learn valuable skills and gain industry knowledge in a wide variety of workplaces.

We are always on the look-out for new businesses who would be interested in hosting our students. These work placements could be either one day a week for a Semester (approximately 15 weeks) or as a one or two week block during May 6 to 17 or September 16 to 27.

Please contact Aaron Gale the VET Coordinator at aaron.gale@scotch.wa.edu.au or (08) 9383 6817 if you are keen to be involved.

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Senior School Important Dates

Date

Event

Location

Time

Week 10B

     

Monday 1 April

World's Greatest Shave

PLC

3.45pm – 5.30pm

Tuesday 2 April

Year 11 PE Studies Excursion

Claremont Golf Course

12noon – 2.30pm

Wednesday 3 April

Year 9 NAPLAN Online Trial Test

   
 

Year 11 Drama ATAR Practical Examinations

   
 

Years 9 and 10 Da Vinci Decathlon

UWA

8.30am – 3.30pm

Friday 5 April

Senior School Marching and Assembly

Dickinson Centre

8.30am – 9.45am

Saturday 6 April

Scotch College v Hale School Practice Fixtures (Firsts Teams as directed)

Various

9.30am start

Sunday 7 April

Year 9 Bibbulmun Track Expedition departs

 

Returns 10 April

 

Anderson House Family Gathering

Gooch Pavilion

4.00pm – 6.00pm

       

Week 11A

     

Monday 8 April

Pipe Band Basel Tour Auditions

Pipe Band Room

 

Tuesday 9 April

Water Polo Dinner

Dining Room Annexe

6.15pm – 8.30pm

 

Friends of Scotch Music (FOSM) Meeting

Senior Music Department

7.00pm – 8.30pm

Wednesday 10 April

Basketball Wind Up

Gymnasium

5.30pm – 8.30pm

Thursday 11 April

Year 11 and 12 Certificate II Music Excursion

WAAPA

8.45am – 1.15pm

 

Residential Life Parents' Dinner

Chapel Lawn, Middle School Library Balcony and Dining Room Annexe

6.00pm – start

Friday 12 April

Senior School Marching and Assembly

Dickinson Centre

8.30am – 9.45am

 

Summer Term ends for Senior School boys (No Year 9 sport training)

 

1.00pm

 

Duke of Edinburgh Abrolhos Islands Expedition departs

 

Returns Thursday 18 April

 

Residential Life Parent Teacher Student Interviews

Dickinson Centre

1.30pm – 3.30pm

 

Football Camp commences

 

Concludes Monday 15 April

Sunday 14 April

Rugby Camp commences

 

Concludes Thursday 17 April

Monday 15 April

State Schools Team Sailing Regatta commences

 

Concludes Wednesday 17 April

Wednesday 17 April

Salvation Army Soup Kitchen

Northbridge

6.15am – 9.30am

Wednesday 24 April

Rugby Festival

 

Concludes 27 April

Sunday 28 April

50 Mile Walk Practice

Depart PLC

 
       

Week 1B

     

Monday 29 April

Staff Day (no classes)

   
 

Boarding House opens

 

3.00pm

 

Boys to be back in Boarding House

 

By 5.30pm

Tuesday 30 April

Autumn Term commences for Senior School boys (Winter Uniform)

   
 

Winter sport training commences in the afternoon (please visit sport.scotch.wa.edu.au for details)

   

Wednesday 1 May

Year 10 Parent Teacher Student Interviews

Dickinson Centre

4.00pm – 8.00pm

 

Winter Sports Captains Conference

Dining Room Annexe

4.15pm – 6.30pm

Thursday 2 May

Mt Gambier Jazz Festival departs

Mt Gambier

Concludes Monday 6 May

Friday 3 May

Senior School Marching and Assembly

Dickinson Centre

8.30am – 9.45am

 

PSA Sport – Aquinas College v Scotch College (please visit sport.scotch.wa.edu.au for details)

Away

1.30pm – 4.00pm

 

Year 11 Parent Evening

 

6.30pm - 9.30pm

Saturday 4 May

PSA Sport – Aquinas College v Scotch College (please visit sport.scotch.wa.edu.au for details

Away

8.30am - various

Week 2B

     

Monday 6 May

Year 11 and 12 WACE and Year 12 Diploma Examination Period commences (Year 11 Diploma classes as per usual)

   
 

Year 11 and 12 AAP Work Experience, Examinations or classes

   
 

A day in the life of a WACE student

Senior School

8.30am - 3.30pm

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Boys' Achievements

Josh Keatch (Year 11, Keys) and Toby Knox–Lyttle (Year 11, Brisbane) both qualified for the Australian Junior Athletics Championships, to be held in April, in Sydney.

David Stulpner (Year 11,  Cameron) has been named Junior Piper of the Year by the Highland Pipers Society of Western Australia.

Harry Sugars (Year 12, Alexander) and Eddy Hopkins (Year 12, St Andrews) have been selected for the 2019 WA State Pathway Squad for Rowing WA, through WAIS to compete at the Australian National Team Selection Regatta in Sydney in April.

Robi Davis (Year 10, Brisbane) finished as the WA State Champion in Board Diving.

The A Team Pipe Band competed at the Floreat Fives (an inaugural quintet pipe band competition) hosted by the Perth Highland Pipe Band on Sunday at Perry Lakes. Scotch won both the Selection of Marches and Medley elements in Grade 4 and Juvenile.

Hamish Meston (Year 9, Ross) has been selected for the 2019 Under 15s Boys Black State Hockey Team competing at the National Championships in Narella, NSW.

2019 Swimming Champion Boys are:

U/15: Hayden Moon (Year 9, Stuart)

U/16: Nicolas Le Page (Year 10, Anderson) and Ruan van der Riet (Year 10, Ross)

U/17: Nicolas Monger Molowny (Year 11, Alexander)

OPEN: Callum Griffiths (Year 12, Shearer)

Colours for Community and Service

PREFERRED

SURNAME

YEAR

HOUSE

PREVIOUS COLOURS

Lincoln

Allan

12

Ross

Athletics 18

Benjamin

Gale

12

Ross

Athletics Cricket 18

Harry

Gilchrist

12

Keys

Cross Country 16 Drama 18

Julian

Kyriakou

11

Stuart

Water Polo 18

Nicolas

Monger Molowny

11

Alexander

Swimming 18

Alex

Van Hoek

12

Ross

Cadets Volleyball 18

         

NEW COLOURS

       

Conor

Lenny

12

Anderson

 

Liam

McCreery

12

Keys

 

William

Moffat-Clarke

10

Stuart

 

Oscar

Moss

12

Ferguson

 

Alistair

Watters

12

St Andrews

 

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Careers Information

Schools Curriculum & Standards Authority Notices

Non School-Candidates 2019

Non-school candidates are typically Year 12 WACE students who wish to sit a language examination through interstate language examination where the course is not offered at Scotch College (e.g. Italian, German, Indonesian Background Speaker) or a Year 12 student who is undertaking the French background language examination where the course is not offered at Scotch College.

Applications forms for Non-School Candidates are available from Mr Frusher at Scotch College. Applications close on Thursday 4 April 2019.

Changes to Enrolments Year 12 students

Year 12 students are able to withdraw from ATAR courses with practical examination components up until Friday 26 July and from ATAR courses which do not have practical examination components up until Thursday 15 August 2019.

Year 12 students are able to withdraw from General courses up until Thursday 15 August 2019.

Students need discuss any changes of enrolments with Mr Frusher prior to the dates indicated above. 


UWA

Year 10 & 11  – Individual Advisory Sessions

During the upcoming school holidays, UWA will be holding Individual Advisory Sessions for Year 10 - 11 students. These sessions are available from the 15 - 17 April. This is the opportunity to ask questions and learn more about:

  • UWA courses
  • Entry requirements
  • Subject selection advice
  • The ATAR process
  • The UWA student experience

Bookings are essential due to a limited number of sessions.

Parents/guardians are welcome to attend

  • 15, 16 and 17 April 2019, 10am – 7:30pm

Register now  

St George's College

St George's College provides accommodation for students studying at universities in Perth and is the oldest and most prestigious residential college in Western Australia.  Free gym memberships, tutoring, social events and three meals a day are included in our competitive fees. Apply today to join the community of St George's College for 2020. Applications are welcome from metropolitan, regional and international students.

For more information check out our webpage  www.stgeorgescollege.uwa.edu.au,  email  admin@stgeorgescollege.uwa.edu.au  or call 9449 5555. Information about scholarships can be found here:  http://stgeorgescollege.uwa.edu.au/future-students/scholarships/.

Notre Dame University

0ne-on-one advice sessions

Fremantle   15 Apr 2019 - 18 Apr 2019

Considering your university options but unsure of the right degree for you?

Notre Dame advisors can introduce you to a range of programs that align with your strengths and interests to help you find the right degree for you.

Book your 1-on-1 session here >

Can't make it? Contact us on 08 9433 0533 or email future@nd.edu.au  to arrange an alternative time.

National Institute of Dramatic Art – Introduction to Acting

Saturday 20 April 2019
A series of 50 minute sessions to be held throughout the day.  Visit our tent on the corner of High St & Packenham St

Notre Dame is proud to host this workshop by the National Institute of Dramatic Art as part of the Notre Dame West End Weekender in conjunction with the City of Fremantle's Street Arts Festival.

See what acting is all about in this complimentary come-and-try session especially for children and young adults.

Work with a NIDA professional to explore improvisation, character and scene-work as you take your first steps on your creative journey.

50 minute sessions to be held throughout the day.

To register go to:

https://www.notredame.edu.au/events-items/nida-introduction-to-acting-free-session

Murdoch University

Health Open Night Wednesday 10 April 2019  
5.00 - 7.30pm

Whether you're passionate about caring for others or curious about how the human body works, a Health degree from Murdoch will help you discover how people think, function and move. Learn about our Sport Science course, ranked amongst the best in the world, and experience our specialist Nursing and Chiro facilities.

Book now

Murdoch University | A Day in the Life of a Health, Engineering, Science, and Education Student

Tuesday 23 April | 9.00am - 3.00pm | Murdoch University

Experience life as a Murdoch student through our popular A Day in The Life series. Pick classes for the day and attend workshops, lectures and labs with potential new classmates. You will experience a taste of everything Murdoch has to offer, from our world class facilities to our green and vibrant campus.

If you're in Year 11 or Year 12 you're invited to join us to experience everything Murdoch has to offer! Explore our facilities, meet our staff, experience campus life and attend a variety of classes of your choice. You'll also be able to learn about our courses in Health, Engineering, Science and Education.

Find out more here:  https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-murdoch-health-engineering-science-and-education-student-tickets-53986005596?aff=WEB

 

Which is the best University?

I am often asked this question so here is a website that you can access to provide some insight into the question. The top 10 is made up by cities from eight countries, including one Australian entry.  Read More

When you open this site, there are links to many universities and the courses they offer.

Interactive ICT Career Wheel

This site provides an interactive way to explore your possible future in an IT career. It shows which kinds of skills are necessary for different jobs in IT. Check it out –https://www.careersfoundation.com.au/

Apprenticeship Opportunities

 Apprenticeship Central  advertises full and part-time apprenticeships as well as a number of opportunities for school-based apprenticeships.

http://www.apprenticeshipcentral.com.au/

Directions WA  is a community based, not for profit organisation working with employers, students and jobseekers in WA. Directions also take expressions of interest for a number of other positions that are not yet open.  https://directionswa.com.au/job-seekers/job-opportunities/

Academic Associates

Year 12 enrichment program at UWA 23-27 April 2019.

ATAR enrichment courses will consist of 10 hours in each subject, two hours each day over five days with academic extension in ATAR courses with advanced content insight and practise in higher level exam questions.

Enrol on-line:  www.academicgroup.com.au

Academic Group

ATAR Revision will help students to consolidate their subject knowledge, boost their confidence and apply what they have learnt a school to maximise their marks. The program will be taught by excellent teachers who will provide structured revision for students and prepare them for their first semester exams.

Each course is six hours (three hours/day over two days at Churchlands SHS, Rossmoyne SHS and Perth Modern.

Enrol on-line:  www.acdaemicgroup.com.au

  Mr Peter Frusher
Careers Adviser

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The Raven

The Summer edition of The Raven is out.  Congratulations to the following boys who have had their creative writing or visual art published in it:

Ben Parker (Year 12, Keys), Harry Pasich(Year 12, Ross), Benji Steinberg (Year 12, Ferguson), Blake Costello (Year 12, St Andrews), Harry Gilchrist (Year 12, Keys), Hamish Watson (Year 12, Ross), Chris Merritt (Year 12 Anderson), Jock Mactier (Year 12, Stuart), Lachie McGrath (Year 12, Shearer), Nathan Cuthbertson (Year 12 , Stuart), Oscar Harold (Year 12, Cameron), Sam Haberland (Year 12, Brisbane), George Lewin (Year 11, Ferguson), Daniel Messina (Year 11, Keys), Reuben Westerman (Year 11, Keys), Lachlan Stephenson (Year 11, Alexander), Burke Carrington (Year 11, Keys), Finn Lumsden Lowe (Year 11, Ferguson), James Devereux (Year 11, Ferguson), Lachlan Simpson (Year 11, Stuart), Lee Youngman (Year 11 Cameron) and Baden Ralls (Year 11, Anderson). 

The visuals in this edition of The Raven are very clever protest posters that some of our Year 11s have designed themselves.

You can visit this new Summer edition of The Raven via the Scotch homepage https://home.scotch.wa.edu.au/theraven/ .  Any boy who has creative writing that he would like to submit to The Raven can send a copy to  jeannette.weeda@scotch.wa.edu.au 

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Senior School Inter-House Cross-Country

Final results for the 2019 Senior School Inter-House Cross-Country Event

1st

Keys

427.7

2nd

Alexander

420.8

3rd

St Andrews

407.8

4th

Cameron

395.9

5th

Brisbane

385.3

6th

Shearer

376.2

7th

Ross

371.6

8th

Ferguson

369.3

9th

Anderson

361.2

10th

Stuart

344.9

The top 3 runners in each age group were as follows

Year 9

1st

Tane Hasler

St Andrews

10:46

2nd

Kalib Dempster Park

Shearer

11:10

3rd

Hugo Elliot

Stuart

11:15

Year 10

1st

Anthony Ghiselli

Alexander

10:45

2nd

Oscar Clements

Alexander

10:47

3rd

James Macgeorge

Anderson

10:55

Year 11

1st

Tobias Knox Lyttle

Brisbane

09:52

2nd

Joshua Keatch

Keys

09:58

3rd

Riley Waters

Anderson

10:22

Year 12

1st

Harry Imison

Ross

10:29

2nd

Kane Kennedy

Ross

10:38

3rd

Harrison Gilchrist

Keys

10:41

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Support Groups

Basketball End of Season Celebration

To celebrate the end of a very successful 2018/19 basketball season, a wind-up function has been organised for Wednesday, 10 April in the Scotch College gym for basketball players in Years 7 to 12 and their families.

This is a different, less formal format to those of previous years.  The boys will be organising their own games and activities from 5:30 to 7.00pm.  This will be followed by team presentations from 7.00pm.

A BBQ dinner with a sausage sizzle plus drink is available to be ordered for $10.00 per person by visiting the Scotch College website www.scotch.wa.edu.au and clicking on the "Book a Scotch Event' icon.  This is available to all players, parents, and siblings.

We hope you are able to join us.

Mrs Michelle Thomas
Basketball Support Group

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Scotch Parents

Wow!  What a stunning evening it was for the Scotch Parents Cocktail Ball on Saturday night.  The DC was transformed into a 1930's Speakeasy complete with fringed chandeliers, jazz band and champagne cart. A huge thank you to Ian Knobel, who as a Year 13 parent, still put in an enormous amount of time and effort into making the evening such a success.  Special thanks also to the hardworking organising committee and Deb Edgar from Hire Society, Bec Grace from Natural Art Flowers and Tony Salom from OMG Events. Scotch Catering and Kale Tatam and his crew were amazing and worked tirelessly to ensure a fantastic evening was had by all.

sp-ball-committee-image.jpg

2019 Scotch Parents Ball Organising Committee

Upcoming Events supported by Scotch Parents…

  • Year 9 Parents – Coffee morning on Monday 8 April at Odyssea, City Beach after drop-off
  • Year 8 Parents – Coffee morning on Tuesday 30 April at Cimbalina's, Eric Street, Cottesloe after drop-off
  • Year 11 Parents – Sundowner on Friday 3 May at 6.30pm
  • Year 10 Parents – Sundowner on Friday 17 May at 6.30pm

Ms Sara Hector
President
Scotch Parents

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Michael Silbert President of the OSC

OSC

Mr Michael Silbert
President of the OSC

Old Scotch Collegians

Old Scotch Collegians are very excited to launch our alumni mentoring programme. This will be a semi-structured and formal one-on-one mentoring programme, purely for the alumni of Scotch College. Alumni from all stages of post-Scotch College life are eligible to be mentors or mentees (or both!) – university students, apprentices, young professionals, experienced professionals and retirees. We all have something that we can learn from or teach others. To apply, please click here.

As a reminder, the 2019 Beverley Dinner is being held on Friday 5 April 2019. The dinner is being hosted by Wesley College at the Beverley Golf Club, and the guest speaker this year is Dean Nalder MLA, State Shadow Treasurer and Shadow Minister for Finance; Energy. Old Scotch Collegians are able to register here.  

Old Scotch Collegians who are experienced at sailing are invited to 'save the date' of Sunday 5 May for the annual College Cup, held at the Royal Freshwater Bay Yacht Club. Those interested in participating are asked to contact the alumni office at cass.macgowan@scotch.wa.edu.au.

A more complete list of our 2019 events can be found on the Upcoming Events page of the alumni website.

The OSC office has a number of Reporters from 2017, 2016 and 2015 that are yet to be collected. If your household is missing a copy, please contact the OSC office to collect one.